Access denied: wheelchair metro maps versus everyone elses

From Paris to New York, we’ve matched metro maps against versions that only include fully accessible stations. The results are discouraging – but are any cities doing it right?

Source : Access denied: wheelchair metro maps versus everyone elses | Cities | The Guardian

You Can Get There From Here – Evaluating Transportation Diversity: Multimodal Planning for Efficient and Equitable Communities

‘Transportation diversity’ refers to the variety of mobility and accessibility options available in a particular situation, including various modes, services and destinations. A transport system must be diverse in order to serve diverse demands, including the needs of people who cannot, should not or prefer not to drive. Multimodal planning that increases transport system diversity tends to increase efficiency, equity and resilience, and achieves specific planning goals. Conventional planning undervalues many of these benefits, resulting in less diverse, more automobile-dependent transport systems than optimal to serve user needs and achieve planning goals. This report examines consumer demands for various travel options, transport diversity benefits, and methods for evaluating optimal transport system diversity.

Source : You Can Get There From Here – choice.pdf

A noter :

  • Le tableau 4 : plutôt intéressant et peut resservir éventuellement, bien que très généraliste.
  • En pages 20 et suivantes, des indicateurs sur la performance multimodale.
  • Figure 13 : part modale dans différentes villes USA. NYC largement TC.
  • Sur cette page <http://shrinkthatfootprint.com/shrink-your-travel-footprint>, on retrouve de manière plus claire un graphique sur « l’intensité carbone de différents modes de transport ».

Freight tram trial delivers for retailer

A French project to develop a concept for freight operations on light rail networks reached a milestone on the morning of June 13, when a tram was used to deliver merchandise to a retailer in St Etienne.

The trial delivery to the Casino store in Place Carnot was organised as part of the TramFret project, an initiative led by research and development institute Efficacity, which is being supported by St Etienne public transport operator Stas.

Special authorisation was granted for the trial by STRMTG, the national agency responsible for tramway safety.

TramFret says the trial will enable it to optimise the system, begin industrial development of the concept, and study its sustainability.

If the first phase of the trial is successful further testing will be carried out in St Etienne in the coming weeks.

 

Source : Freight tram trial delivers for retailer

Norway to ‘completely ban petrol powered cars by 2025’

Norway will ban the sale of all fossil fuel-based cars in the next decade, continuing its trend towards becoming one of the most ecologically progressive countries on the planet, according to reports.

Source : Norway to ‘completely ban petrol powered cars by 2025’

Best Practice in National Support for Urban Transportation

Large cities of the world require strong coverage of rapid transit networks to ensure they remain competitive, and that local communities have a healthy environment, vibrant urban economy, and an equitable, high quality of life for all residents. Many cities—especially those with growing populations, incomes, and/or large infrastructure deficits—have not, however, built rapid transit at the scale and rate needed to meet mobility needs. This paper is Part 2 in a series of research papers that explores how countries can grow their rapid transit infrastructure. This Part focuses on the role that funding, financing, and capacity have played in delivering rapid transit infrastructure in nine countries.

Part 1, Evaluating Country Performance in Meeting the Transit Needs of Urban Populations, released in May 2014, drew upon a comprehensive global data set developed by ITDP of rapid transit infrastructure to create a comparative analysis of rapid transit infrastructure in nine countries that are major contributors to greenhouse gas emissions.

Part 2, Growing Rapid Transit Infrastructure: Funding, Financing, and Capacity, analyzes how the funding practices, financing practices, and institutional capacity impact a country’s ability to deliver rapid transit effectively.

Connecticut’s CTfastrak BRT a Success

Shiny green and white articulated buses glide in and out of sleek stations that protect riders from the elements. Level boarding, simple off and on-board payment, ubiquitous display signs with real-time arrival information and cleanly designed system maps further ensure a comfortable and worry-free user experience. Enthusiastically received by the public, press and authorities, and with robust ridership levels, CTfastrak is a bold display of BRT’s potential to rapidly and radically upgrade transit in US cities.

Source : www.itdp.org

Voir aussi quelques photos et du « avant-après« 

Bus Rapid Transit Nearly Quadruples Over Ten Years

Bus rapid transit has grown by 383 percent in the last ten years, according to new data released by ITDP. As cities around the world discover the benefits and cost effectiveness of BRT, they have built hundreds of systems across dozens of countries that qualify as true BRT. A new interactive map shows a comprehesive list of BRT systems globally, based on in depth data of systems scored in 2013 and 2014.

Source : itdp.org

Five City Transport Transformations that May Surprise You

This article originally appeared on Earthshare, and is reposted here with permission. Earthshare works to engage individuals in building a healthy and sustainable environment by implementing workplace giving campaigns on behalf of environmental and conservation nonprofits. Learn more about donating to ITDP through Earthshare.

When we think of great cities for sustainable transport, we think of picturesque cities in Northern Europe, such as Copenhagen, or wealthy, dense enclaves such as Hong Kong or Singapore. There have, however, been exciting transformations in cities all over the world, particularly in the global south. Here are five cities that have improved quality of life for millions by investing in sustainable, equitable transport.

Source : itdp.org

Global BRTData

The goal of BRTData is to improve the sustainable transport community’s access to reliable and current data about the BRT and bus corridors currently in operation. We aim to improve the quality and impact of the industry by opening up access to data about the design, performance and cost of these systems. The platform provides a convenient repository of data from a variety of sources including researchers, transit agencies, municipalities and NGOs.

Source : Global BRTData

Parking Basics

Parking is a mystery. Many public agencies push for more parking in buildings, but, rather than alleviating the parking problem, it leads to massive traffic jams, severe air pollution, and more road deaths. Under the illusion that density creates congestion, public agencies also control building density. However, it is parking, not density, that creates traffic congestion. Excessive parking supply that is cheap or free induces people to use personal motor vehicles—even when good public transport is provided.

Cities across the world are now realizing their past follies. They now follow a simple mantra— add transit, build density, cut parking. Put another way, where there is good connectivity to mass rapid transit, building density is welcome but parking supply is not. Parking fees are pegged to parking demand—when demand increases, fees also increases. Revenue generated this way is used to build complete streets—with better walking and cycling infrastructure—and expand public transport.

Parking Basics outlines these key principles and steps involved in managing on-street parking and regulating off-street parking.

Source : Parking Basics – Institute for Transportation and Development Policy

Lien direct vers le document.

Recycled energy from Tube train brakes to power stations

A trial designed to collect recycled energy from Tube train brakes has captured enough power to run a London Underground station.

Source : Recycled energy from Tube train brakes to power stations

When Are Bus Lanes Warranted? Considering Economic Efficiency, Social Equity and Strategic Planning Goals

This report describes a framework for determining when bus lanes are warranted. Bus lanes increase urban transport system efficiency and equity by favoring higher value trips and more space-efficient modes over lower-value trips and space-intensive modes. Bus lanes can carry more passengers than general traffic lanes, and so increase total capacity (people per traffic lane), increase transit system operating efficiency, directly benefit bus passengers, cause travelers to shift from automobile to transit which reduces various transportation problems, and support more transit-oriented development. This paper examines how these impacts are considered in conventional planning, describes examples of bus lane planning and evaluation, and discusses ways to optimize their implementation. This analysis suggests that bus lanes are generally warranted where, after all economically justified pro-transit policies are implemented, they would attract more than 800 peak-hour passengers (about 20 buses) on surface streets or 1,800 peak-hour passengers (about 40 buses) on grade-separated highways, since they carry more passengers than a general traffic lane, and so save total travel time. Bus lanes are often justified with even lower ridership levels, due to the additional indirect benefits provided by reduced urban-peak automobile travel. Comprehensive evaluation can justify extensive bus lane networks in most cities, particularly rapidly-growing cities in developing countries.

Via :  Victoria Transport Policy Institute

For an application of this analysis see, “The Case For Bus-Only Lanes on Georgia Street: An Observational Study” (http://bit.ly/1NlTHxI )

It’s amazing how many more commuters would drive less if they didn’t get free parking

The lure of the space overwhelms almost all other commuter benefits.

Via : citylab.com et paristechreview.com